Maple syrup sidecar

The sidecar is my favorite go-to cocktail. Or rather, go-to cocktail where I can tell there is a decent bartender — at shitty places, my go-to is a glass of cheap sparking wine. (This comes from having a horrifyingly bad sidecar made with cheap brandy and no sweetener from Brasserie Margaux a couple years ago. *shudder*)

Aaaanyway, why am I mixing cocktails at 3:07 on a Friday? Because it’s my Sunday, baby, and it’s almost Christmas, and I vacuumed and swept and mopped up a storm and made banana bread out of the worst bananas ever, AND we needed to use up some lemons.

It should go without saying that this drink is better with the highest quality ingredients — I use Cointreau because it really does taste better than other cheaper Triple Sec type options. My brandy this time around was Raynal VSOP, but I would welcome recommendations of other good ones to try. I use organic lemons and organic Grade B syrup — it has a stronger mapley flavor than Grade A.

Maple Syrup Sidecar
2 oz VSOP brandy or cognac
1 oz Cointreau or equivalent
2 oz lemon juice, strained
1/2 oz Grade B maple syrup

Combine all and shake well with ice, pour directly into glass, or strain into chilled glass if desired. Skip the sugared rim unless you need it for the aesthetics; if you must sugar the rim, reduce syrup in drink by 1/4 oz, grind your sugar to superfine using a (well-cleaned!) coffee bean grinder or food mill, and use maple syrup to make the sugar stick to the rim.

Indispensable tools for the job: shakerstainless steel funnel with strainer, mini measuring cup

Cheers!

Tales of cocktails

Every once in a while, a strange invention will come out of needing to use up a certain ingredient. Two odd cocktails were born out of such circumstances over the winter holiday break, and I figured I might as well describe them since both turned out surprisingly tasty.

First was the scary greenish concoction pictured here, for which I am accepting name suggestions. (Ideas so far include Zombie Plague and Antifreeze.) This occurred because a bottle of my fancy Q Tonic had been erroneously opened the night before, and was about to go flat — and at nearly $2.50 per 8 oz bottle, I wasn’t about to let that happen. But we had no cucumber or lime, and thus could not properly enjoy a G&T with any sort of gin on hand.

So inventiveness reigned! I mixed fresh lemon juice, Hendrick’s Gin, Midori Liqueur, Cointreau, and shook them with ice, then combined with the remains of the Q. And threw in a couple ice cubes because I figured it might take me a while to down it all, and I like my drinks chilly.

These are all the lovely spirits (or spirit-specific mixers) I used. Sometimes I just want to look at liquor bottles all day long -- so elegant.

The verdict? Surprisingly not terrible. (High praise, I know — but when you look at the thing, you can understand my skepticism, right?) I might actually make this in the future — the end bitterness of the tonic has a nice contrast to the normally-too-candy-like Midori, and I like pretty much anything that has Hendricks and/or Cointreau poured into it. (Yes, I know Cointreau is über sweet, but it’s also “spirited” so hush.)

Next up was what I guess is a variation of a Creamsicle. See, for this one, we had planned a ladies’ night out… but one pal forgot her wallet, which contained her ID (and she’s babyfaced and infallibly gets carded). Through some creative problem solving, we were able to enjoy a night of revelry anyhow, but after the fact I was left with a stainless steel flask that had about a shot and a half of Absolut Mandarin in it. Not wanting to let that stuff go to waste (or take on a metallic taste as it sat too long in said flask), I decided to put it to good use in a cocktail.

Another massive leftover we have is San Pellegrino Aranciata (and Limonata) soda, because we bought them as refreshments to include in the hotel welcome bags for out of town wedding guests this summer. We certainly don’t mind having a handful of cans left over, but we don’t often drink these normally so they haven’t disappeared yet. So I went ahead and repurposed one for this cocktail invention.

Now, so far we have orange vodka and natural orange soda. Those go fine when simply combined together, but I’d had enough of SP soda-based half-assed cocktails in lazier moments that I wanted to really jazz it up a bit and go a bit dessertier. So I juiced a satsuma, added a dash of our old friend Cointreau, and shook the alcohols and juices with ice, then poured them with the soda and added a generous measure of half and half and an orange slice to garnish.  Rich, creamy, yummy, and stealthily potent!

And the best part is, I didn’t waste a single drop of anything.